Assignment Anti Bias Observations We have investigated and examined many forms of bias. Our thoughts and ideas about this subject come from our relationships with others and many are formed within our own realm of bias. Now we are going to be find curriculum and materials representing non-biased ideals. You will be examining an early childhood classroom (in a 3 or 4 year old classrooms) and noting six examples of materials representing anti-bias curriculum. Then you will reflect on materials you would include in your future classroom. You will decide what was the one thing that best represented diversity in classroom you explored and take a picture of it. That picture will be submitted with your assignment. Finally again, you will reflect on your feelings about this topic. The final assignment is done on the Anti-Bias Observation Form, which I have also attached in the additional materials. Introduction Anti-Bias Classroom When talking about Anti-Biased Classroom, there are many attributes that work together to create this type of unbiased environment. Three areas that Louise Derman-Sparks works with are the aesthetic display of the classroom, the toys that are provided to the students, and teacher interactions. The look of an anti-bias classroom is one of the world. The classroom does not focus on just one culture but many cultures. To create an aesthetic environment there should be many images of families and children of all cultures as well as the acceptance of these other families and cultures. The children should take part in art and look at books pertaining to cultures that are not just their own (Brown, DeBord, 1999). Art is a great way to teach students about different cultures. Display from artists of different cultures and encourage the children to do their own art similar to the art they see. Some other fun anti-biased activities to do in the classroom could include trying a new recipe from another culture. Not only will this introduce children to a different culture, it will also give children to opportunity to try new things that they may have not be able to try outside the classroom. To create a successful anti-biased classroom, the toys should be divided into four areas. The four areas suggested for stocking your play centers include: Wooden or plastic figures of diverse people and animals, food boxes from ethnic grocers, unique props for dramatic play, and coins and money from different countries (Scholastic, 2011). This is a useful step for child care professionals to begin creating an anti-biased environment in their classroom. The anti-bias curriculum seeks to be active and committed to teaching children how to properly embrace and address diversity in areas of color, language, gender, culture, and physical ability. From a very young age children are aware of these differences and observe the attitudes and messages being reflected by those around them. In turn, the children take on these attitudes. It is the goal of the anti-bias curriculum to address negative attitudes and teach children to interact effectively with all people they meet. In order to have an effective anti-bias curriculum, teachers must raise their own awareness. It can be very helpful for teachers and potential teachers to be part of support groups. These support groups include other staff members, parents, and other teachers, and they face questions like: When did I experience bias in my life and how did I respond or react? The group works toward facing any biases those in the group have personally. There are so many ways to encourage an anti-biased classroom such as involving the parents in the classroom and activities, start teaching your students simple words in other languages, or try new foods from other cultures. Have a ‘Give the planet a hug rug,’ which has children of many different cultures on it, or a ‘Hands around the world rug’ that has the different countries and children of many different cultures holding hands around the edge. Another recommended idea is to make everything in the room accessible to all of the children, including children that may have a handicap. The classroom environment, materials provided and the way the teacher interacts with the students and family are all very essential to creating an Anti-Biased Classroom. While creating an anti-biased environment can be somewhat challenging, it will benefit the children to learn about and accept other cultures. In the end, teachers can only hope this will be a step towards a more accepting world. ©Susan Casey, 2013 Program and Student Learning Objective Anti-Bias Curriculum PLO 3 Candidates use their knowledge of students, learning, curriculum, environment, diversity, communication, and community to plan and implement collaborative engaging, thought provoking, inquiry-based instruction to meet the needs of all learners. SLO 3.6 Candidates identify areas of diversity impacted (bias, language, culture, gender, ethnicity, race) in early childhood environments and throughout early childhood curriculum. Teacher Talk Anti-Bias Early childhood educators have deep faith in the principle that all people deserve the opportunities and resources to fulfill their complete humanity. Moreover, we have a unique role in making this principle real, in promoting all children’s chances to thrive and to succeed in school, in work, and in life. A basic principle in early childhood work is that when educators treat children as if they are strong, intelligent, and kind, children are far more likely to behave in strong, intelligent, kind ways. They are more likely to learn and thrive and succeed. But what happens when children receive messages about themselves of disapproval, of disdain, of dislike? What happens when children do not see themselves or their families reflected and respected in their early childhood programs? When adults do not actively guide children’s thinking about diversity, how do children make sense of information—accurate or biased—about people who are different from themselves? “I don’t want to sit next to her. She talks funny,” comments a 3-year-old, regarding a new teacher who speaks English with a strong accent. “I don’t want to!” defiantly states a 4-year-old from a single-mom family when the teacher announces they are making cards for Father’s Day. Each of these statements, whether made by teachers or children, sends a negative message about self-worth—evidence of harmful lessons learned about oneself or about others. In an anti-bias classroom, teachers intervene with immediate and follow up activities to counter the cumulative, hurtful effects of these messages. In an anti-bias classroom, children learn to be proud of themselves and of their families, to respect human differences, to recognize bias, and to speak up for what is right. Teacher Talk Creating an Anti-Bias Environment Taken from the works of Derman-Sparks here is a reference sheet to help you create an Anti-Bias environment and to aid you in completing your assignment this week. 1. Images in abundance of all the children, families, and staff in your program. 2. If the classroom population is racially/ethnically homogeneous, images of children and adults from the major racial/ethnic groups in your community and in US society. 3. Images that accurately reflect people’s current daily lives in the US working and with their families during recreational activities 4. A numerical balance among different groups. Make sure people of color are not represented as tokens – only one or two. 5. A fair balance of images of women and men, shown doing “jobs in the home” and “jobs outside the home.” Show women and men doing blue-collar work and pink-collar work, as well as white-collar work. 6. Images of elderly people of various backgrounds doing different activities. 7. Images of differently abled people of various background shown doing work and with their families in recreational activities. 8. Images of diversity in family styles: single mothers or fathers, extended families, gay or lesbian families, families in which one parent and a grandparent are the parents, interracial and multi ethnic families, adopted families, differently abled families. 9. Images of important individuals – past and present – should reflect racial/ethnic, gender, and abledness diversity and they should include people who participated in important struggles for social justice. 10. Artwork-prints, sculpture, textiles by artist of various backgrounds that reflect the aesthetic environment and the culture of the families represented in your classroom, and of groups in your community and in the US. Assignment Anti Bias Observations We have investigated and examined many forms of bias. Our thoughts and ideas about this subject come from our relationships with others and many are formed within our own realm of bias. Now we are going to be find curriculum and materials representing non-biased ideals. You will be examining an early childhood classroom (in a 3 or 4 year old classrooms) and noting six examples of materials representing anti-bias curriculum. Then you will reflect on materials you would include in your future classroom. You will decide what was the one thing that best represented diversity in classroom you explored and take a picture of it. That picture will be submitted with your assignment. Finally again, you will reflect on your feelings about this topic. The final assignment is done on the Anti-Bias Observation Form, which I have also attached in the additional materials.

    ECH 328 Practicum

    Anti-Bias Observation

    Name__________________________________________________           

    Date of Observation______________________________________

    Location of Observation___________________________________

    Time of Observation______________________________________

    Classroom Observed______________________________________

    Review the muniment in your resigned area about how you can imagine an Anti-bias Environment.  What examples of an Anti-bias environment can be set-up in the arrangeroom? (List locations and the materials)

    1. The arrange had a multiformity of toys, idiosyncratic objects, and wholeege foods that are cogitation a ample gamut of ethnic and cultural settings located in the gesticulatory dramatize areas.  

    2. The arrangeroom had a gesticulatory area that was easily ingenuous to end with visual, substantial, or reception eespecial needs.

    3. The readiness materials are located on the readiness hole compriseed a dissimilarity of colors of paints, crayons, collage materials, and dramatize dough which the end can explanation ce purposes of developing their readiness skills and besides to illustrate their skin tones.

    4. The dramatize hole compriseed dolls and figures that adequately illustrateed a multiformity of opposed knots such as gender, amelioration, race/ethnicity, substantial power, and tenure.

    5. The books shelves compriseed a dissimilarity of books written in English and other languages. Aid, the books compriseed a dissimilarity of pictures that illustrateed race from opposed setting, opposed ameliorations, and opposed abilities portrayed in their nativity and daily subsists. The books besides uniquely illustrateed separate gender roles ce twain boys and girls.

    6. The arrangeroom walls were cheerful with posters, photos, and Drawings that illustrate whole end, opposed nativity setups, and staffs in the instruct program. Moreover, the images impress a weigh unmoulded opposed knots. Aid, the images supposing an respectful reflecting of the daily activities fascinated by the families amid the association including nativity reanimation activities, and a dissimilarity of exertion settings. A affecting indication renowned was that there is a open weigh of gender amid the images.

    What are some separate materials or ideas you would affect to instrument in your hold arrangeroom in the future

    1. One of the separate materials is books that comprise pictures illustrateing opposed cultural and ethnic settings. Aid, they should be written in opposed languages to acceleration settle opposed end fixed on their settings.

    2. The arrangeroom should accept a store of images that fan a import of shared culture, impartiality, faith, a import of heterogenity, and a import of sensibility that makes the end reach that they subsist in a caring connection, generous of opportunities, openness, and offers pleasure ce whole members of the connection.

    3. The arrangeroom should enclose inhospitableness to voice from opposed cultural settings illustrateing opposed cultural styles. The voice should either be pre-recorded or alternatively imagined in the arrangeroom.

    What did you conceive was the best examples of Multiformity?  Why? Enclose Picture of Best Example.

    Fixed on the reality that the arrangeroom was collected of discordant end, the images on the walls generousy illustrateed multiformity past they included of a dissimilarity of gender-sensitive pictures, drawings, painting s and photos that illustrateed opposed cultural and ethnic settings.   

    Reflect on your sensibilitys about the correctness of creating an Anti-bias Arrangeroom.  

    Creating an Anti-Bias arrangeroom is purely expressive in that it seeks to know-again and summon the biases that exists amid advice and exertions towards eliminating these prejudices from the culture environment. Creating an Anti-Bias arrangeroom places multiformity and equity appearances as the guide drivers towards the day-to-day education and culture activities. The overarching appearance of creating an Anti-Bias arrangeroom is to imagine a weather that fans a settled headstrong and aid supports knot unity crop conceptional ce enabling end to finish their generous immanent (Derman-Sparks & Edwards, 2009).

    References

    Derman-Sparks, L., & Edwards, J. O. (2009). Anti-Bias Advice ce Young Childen and Ourselves. National Association ce the Advice of You.